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child support attorney orlando fl

The marriage rate in the state of Florida has dropped below fifty percent, but that still leaves many marriages ending in divorce. The tough choice to dissolve a marriage is more difficult when there are children involved. A child support attorney can help you determine how much you must pay your ex-spouse for the care and support of your joint children. Here is a brief overview of child support in Florida.

State Calculations

While a child support attorney Orlando FL can give you a more exact number of how much you owe, the state of Florida bases child support on both you and your ex-spouse’s incomes. Most divorce situations do not result in a zero payment, though that is possible if both incomes and overnight visits are equal.

Allowable Deductions

The calculations can be affected by a variety of allowable deductions. Local, state and federal tax deductions on income, union dues and children’s health insurance premiums can help lower the amount owed. If you already owe spousal or child support from a previous marriage, that can positively affect the amount owed. Additional deductions may affect the payment each month.

Gross Income

The amount owed is based on the gross income of both parties. Income is merely a starting point and does not account for allowable deductions. Any income received from commissions, salary and wages, business income, overtime pay, tips, bonuses, unemployment, pension, rental income, disability benefits, annuity payments, spousal support from previous marriages and retirement are all considered as part of gross income.

Court Deviations

In some cases, the court may consider additional factors when calculating how much is owed for child support in addition to what is listed here. However, generally these work in most cases to determine an appropriate amount to help support the children.

Raising children can be expensive and that doesn’t change due to a divorce. Child support helps cover the costs of raising a child for the main custodial parent with lower income. Your attorney can further advise you prior to court and after.